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Wednesday, December 11, 2013

· Wool Regency Tailcoat ·


My sewing business keeps me happily busy but my projects usually fall under the alterations or modern custom work category, so when I was asked to make a Regency tailcoat, it was a most welcome change from my normal! :-)  

The original plan was to use the Country Wives tailcoat pattern to make this coat, but after trying on the mock-up it was evident that the pattern was, unfortunately, totally unusable.  The pattern's armholes and neck are alarmingly large- even taking into account a more modern fit, they are much too large for asthetics or movement. 

Thankfully, my friend Gabe was able to make a custom tailcoat draft from Peter's measurements, so I was saved the headache of trying to fumble my own way through a solution. :-)  He makes custom drafted patterns based off of your personal measurements and specializes in 17th- 19th century mens clothing.  Check out his etsy shop for custom garments and patterns!  The new draft worked wonderfully, and looks great! :-)

Unfortunately, I currently only have pictures of it on a hanger.  It (obviously!) looks so much better when it's on, but these will have to suffice for now. ;-)


The tailcoat is machine-sewn, but all finishing details are done by hand.  I pad-stitched the collar and lapels; and it makes me want to get into tailoring more. ;-)



 The coat is made of a medium weight wool and lined in brown polished cotton.  This was my first time doing official hand-sewn buttonholes, and the thought of it was quite intimidating. :-)  I did lots and lots of reading, several practice ones, and then bit the bullet.  I'm very glad that there were only 3 visible buttonholes, and while they are passable, there is a reason I don't have a picture showcasing them... ;-)  I read somewhere that it takes 1,000 buttonholes before you get the hang of it, so I guess I just have 993 more to go. :-P  Great.  I'm a perfectionist and I love instant gratification just as much as the next person! ;-)


The M-notch collar is made of a very soft cotton velvet, as are the buttons and cuffs. 

· Pictures by Kathryn ·

12 comments:

  1. This is so lovely, and the details are understated but they all work nicely! Great job!

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  2. Very nice! My first sewing machine only had a straight stitch so I had to hand sew all my buttonholes. So I was actually more intimidated to try sewing them by machine at first. :)

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    1. Michelle, how funny! We should trade our buttonhole projects with each other. :-D

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  3. Well, I've been doing buttonholes by hand for years and I'm pretty sure mine never look as good as yours did… which in your opinion is possibly just saying that I make terrible buttonholes. But it's meant to be a compliment in a roundabout way… *cough*

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    1. Thanks dear. :-) So does that mean if you want hand-sewn buttonholes on one of your garments, you'll be satisfied with my pathetic attempts? ;-)

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  4. Lovely! I wonder if your friend might be willing to make a custom pattern pour moi? My roly poly little self is quite frankly beyond the scope of regular patterns and although I have drafted a few patterns for myself, I'd love to have a few simple 30s-40s style dress patterns that are properly done. Not exactly his time period or, I suspect, his usual garment type, but thought I'd ask anyway :-)

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    1. Diane, You could always ask- however, like you said- that's really not his specialty so I can't guarantee results. ;-) If you ever need a costume for Noah, however....! :-)

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  5. Hello Lilly
    I was vainly :) looking on Google images to see if my Etsy listings of Regency Tailcoat Costumes would show up and I just happened to click on a photo of a tailcoat with the M notch and THERE YOU WERE!!!
    This coat is great,You young folks amaze me! Would love to see the riding habit.
    Blessings to you

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